Our Travis Rieder writes, “I know from personal experience: We cannot expect people who use drugs to get better on their own or overnight. It is vital that we meet them where they are.”

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Our Travis Rieder discussed his addiction and journey during a presentation Monday hosted by the Duane Dean Behavioral Health Center in Kankakee, Illinois.

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Drawing from Rieder’s experience and research, ‘In Pain’ explores how the opioid crisis came to be

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After a motorcycle accident that almost took off his foot, Johns Hopkins bioethicist Travis Rieder became dependent on the pain medication he had been prescribed. Though he managed to wean himself off the drugs, the experience prompted him to write “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids.”

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Travis Rieder, author of “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids,” joins Ali Velshi to discuss his own opioid dependence and withdrawal after a serious motorcycle accident, and why it’s so important to understand that opioids are “complex medications,” which means they have both risks and benefits

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As opioid addiction and deadly overdoses escalated into an epidemic across the U.S., thousands of surgeons continued to hand out far more pills than needed for postoperative pain relief, according to a KHN-Johns Hopkins analysis of Medicare data

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An injured bioethicist learned firsthand how desperately patients with severe pain need the relief of powerful drugs—and how little support they get to stop taking them. Our Travis Rieder shares an essay adapted from his forthcoming book ‘In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids’

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“We weren’t happy when a billboard went up saying marijuana laws reduce overdose deaths,” said Brendan Saloner of Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics & Bloomberg School of Public Health. “That was very hard for us to rein in.”

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