Organ Mules

June 7, 2016

While politicians wring their hands about sensible solutions to the organ shortage, scientists are progressing with genetic manipulations that may see human organs grown in pigs

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The first U.S. liver and kidney transplants from a donor with HIV were completed at Johns Hopkins Medicine

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Anonymous Doctor, “I won’t forget the palpable emotion on the ward. Organ donation is not commonplace but can change the lives of so many”

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Despite their slovenly habits in agricultural settings, pigs raised in biomedical labs are clean enough that many humans would welcome —indeed, do welcome — the use of their tissue for life-saving transplants. Transplanted heart valves routinely come from pigs as well as cows

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Josephine Johnston & Eric Trump: “We believe that people deserve access to interventions that can help them build families. Yet the wholly understandable desire to bear a child does not justify the significant risks to mother and fetus posed by uterine transplants, not to mention the enormous financial cost”

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Scientists have developed an innovative 3D bioprinter capable of generating replacement tissue that’s strong enough to withstand transplantation. To show its power, the scientists printed a jaw bone, muscle, and cartilage structures, as well as a stunningly accurate human ear.

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The Ethics of Organ Donation

February 11, 2016

Sheilah Kast talks with playwright Michael Hollinger. His play, Under the Skin, explores questions like these, and the family dynamics surrounding kidney donation. It’s on now at Baltimore’s Everyman Theatre. Also joining her: Johns Hopkins bioethicist Jeffrey Kahn, and two people who know this subject intimately: a kidney donor and a liver transplant recipient

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Dr. Dorry Segev, an associate professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, estimated that organs from 500 to 600 H.I.V.-positive potential donors have gone to waste each year and that allowing those donations could save more than 1,000 people

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