Neuroethics as Outreach

September 12, 2017

Adina Roskies: “In this era in which “alternative facts” are allowed to bear that name, rather than their true name — which is “lies and misinformation” — and in which science is ignored, deemed irrelevant, or actively suppressed, I see a growing need for people in all the sciences and in ethics to speak out and to educate, wherever possible.”

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“If I put myself on the list [for a kidney transplant] and just wait, that’s not proactive,” Okun said. “You get on the list and then do nothing, you might get a kidney and you might not get a kidney. And it’s [a wait of] anywhere from five to nine years.”

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There’s less going on here than meets the eye

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When news breaks – whether the story of a disease outbreak, a terrorist attack or a natural disaster – people increasingly turn to the internet and social media. Individuals use Twitter and Facebook as primary sources for news and information

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Every day, millions of people take to search engines with common concerns, such as “How can I lose weight?” or “How can I be productive?” In return, they find articles that offer simple advice and quick solutions, supposedly based on what “studies have shown.” A closer look at these articles, however, reveals a troubling absence of scientific rigor

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Donnie Missouri, 58, doesn’t have medical training. He started his health career in the linens department in Johns Hopkins Hospital. Now, he works on the front lines — one of the hospital’s non-medical workers who reaches out to patients who doctors think are at risk of suffering setbacks that will force them to return

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For Carnival in Brazil, lots of women don giant feather headdresses and skimpy bikinis. But for a pre-Carnival event, Elaine Cuoto is dressed as a mosquito — complete with a long proboscis and gossamer wings. She is part of a group of health workers dancing by a metro station in a working-class neighborhood of Rio’s north zone

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