But many of us still get the basic facts wrong. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population. Half a billion people were infected

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Vaccination is underway for the 2017-2018 seasonal flu, and next year will mark the 100-year anniversary of the 1918 flu pandemic, which killed roughly 40 million people

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Experts say it’s not a matter of if, but when a global scale pandemic will wipe out millions of people. And we are grossly unprepared for the next major outbreak. But in the event of a devastating pandemic—whether it be triggered by a mutated strain of an existing virus or a bioengineered terror weapon—there are some practical things you can do, both before and during the outbreak, to increase your odds of survival

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Another bird flu is on the rampage in China. Already this winter there have been 424 cases in humans, more than a third of all those identified since the virus emerged in 2013. And it is spreading. This week it was announced that it seems poised to acquire mutations that could make it a much worse problem

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Outpacing Pandemics

January 13, 2017

Vaccines are an essential weapon in fighting disease outbreaks. But how does the time taken to develop vaccines compare to the speed and frequency of outbreaks? And how can we do it better? An engaging data visualization via Mosaic

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Bushmeat, from wild animals captured for food, is a staple in parts of Africa and a delicacy in Europe and beyond. But could smuggled bushmeat expose us to the next big infectious disease? Akshat Rathi finds out

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The Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games pose little additional risk of causing new outbreaks of the Zika virus, the US CDC recently wrote. The report came on the tails of a letter signed by 2401 international experts asking that the Olympics be postponed or moved, as well as the news that athletes, many of them golfers, have decided to sit these games out because they’re concerned about the mosquito-borne virus

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Discussion on future of public health explores rise of pandemics, mental illness in prisons, social justice movements. Bloomberg School event features journalists Sonia Shah, Laura Sullivan, Yamiche Alcindor

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