Clinical trials in the United States have been plagued for years by two well-known problems: They don’t recruit enough people and they fail to reflect the diversity of our nation. The good news is that solving the diversity problem can resolve both issues. Two birds, one stone

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A quiet but revolutionary new nat’l health policy goes into effect this week, ushering in changes that could lead to important medical discoveries that benefit most Americans. One problem. Implementing the change will require that our country’s health researchers make some fundamental changes in how they do business

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Participants in medical research are more empowered than ever to influence the design and outcomes of experiments. Now, researchers are trying to keep up

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The advent of social media technology has opened many new avenues of research in population health, demographics, psychology, and the social sciences

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Tribal leaders are developing a policy for genetic research and data sharing, potentially ending a 15-year moratorium

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“Only less than 8 percent of enrollees are Hispanic, even though Hispanics comprise 17 percent of the population,” said Dr. Eliseo Pérez-Stable, director of NIH’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

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Bioethicists debate whether there is a duty to participate and how it impacts ethical decision-making. Arguments for the duty to participate have been grounded in both beneficence and justice, but justice is the primary justification being offered here

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But parents don’t always understand what they are signing up for. Each week in the United States, about 300 children are diagnosed with cancer. Many of them will be offered treatment as part of a clinical trial that tests different drugs or different ways to give standard drugs

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