“I enjoy working out at the gym,” declares one profile. “To keep myself fit, I like to hike, bike and exercise,” says another. These comments aren’t part of a dating site. Rather, they come from physicians’ online profiles that prospective patients view when they are looking for a new doctor

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Marshall Allen: After I was prescribed a brand-name drug I didn’t need and given a coupon to cover the out-of-pocket costs, I discovered another reason Americans pay too much for health care.

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With the availability of home genetic testing kits from companies such as “23andMe” and “Ancestry DNA,” more people will be getting information about their genetic lineage and what races and ethnicities of the world are included in their DNA

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The Platinum Patients

June 16, 2017

Each year, 1 in every 20 Americans racks up just as much in medical bills as another 19 combined. This critical five percent of the U.S. population is key to solving the nation’s health care spending crisis

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In medicine, we speak of “seeing patients” when we are rounding in the hospital or caring for those who come to our clinics. But what about those people who may be sick but do not seek care? What is our responsibility to the patients we do not see?

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Limiting the number of foreign doctors who can get visas to practice in the United States could have a significant impact on certain hospitals and states that rely on them, according to a new study

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As doctors and health professionals take to public spaces like Twitter and Facebook to curate and create we face new challenges. One of the challenges is how to disclose our relationship to the organizations and products. How do we disclose conflict of interest in so many different kinds of venues?

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Investigators find many examples of unprofessional, ‘potentially objectionable’ behavior online. The study is not the first to bring attention to doctors’ social media use. The issue has been on the medical profession’s radar for a while, said Dr. Matthew DeCamp, of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore

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