The FDA is powerless to stop them. The newly enacted right-to-try law allows drug makers to earn a profit by selling unproven therapies to desperate and dying patients

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The Food and Drug Administration defines a drug shortage as a “period of time when the demand or projected demand for a medically necessary drug in the U.S. exceeds its supply.” All too often, a shortage means that doctors cannot give the right drugs to patients when needed

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Depending on whom you ask, Addyi is the overdue answer to an unmet need or just another way to shame women

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There is a general shortage of information about the safety of medications used during pregnancy—largely because any woman who is pregnant, was recently pregnant, or might get pregnant is barred from participating in most of the clinical trials that evaluate drug safety and efficacy

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Pharma companies don’t have to comply. Large pharmaceutical companies are notoriously risk averse when it comes to expanding access to medications that are still in the testing phase. Many refuse to grant access to investigational drugs outside of clinical trials, and efforts to lobby them to release the medication as part of compassionate use are often rebuffed

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Our Jeremy Greene, a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine said that this was an important first step, but pointed out that shame, alone, may not be a powerful enough incentive to change behavior

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What one city did to fight high drug prices reveals a drug supply chain in which just about every link can benefit when prices go up

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It was 2015 when Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals and the notorious “pharma bro,” jacked up the cost of the lifesaving drug Daraprim by 5,000 percent. Overnight, its price tag skyrocketed from $13.50 a pill to $750

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