China now has at least four groups of CRISPR researchers doing gene editing with large colonies of monkeys

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Gene-editing technology has accelerated progress on animal organ transplant to the point where scientists will soon begin the first human trials

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African swine fever (ASF), a deadly virus in pigs and wild boar, continues to spread in China and will almost certainly wreak havoc in other countries in Asia soon. That’s the somber conclusion from a meeting of animal health experts organized by the United Nations’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Bangkok late last week

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Scientists have engineered swine that pollute less, fend off disease, and produce more meat, but you won’t find them outside experimental farms . . . yet

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If it were tried on a person, it might mean awakening in the ultimate sensory deprivation chamber

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Predicting the next pandemic is tricky work. When the newborn piglets first started getting sick in October 2016, farmers in China’s Guangdong province suspected porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) — a disease they’d seen in the pigs before. And, at first, the tests did come back positive for PEDV. But then something strange happened. By January 2017, the pigs stopped testing positive for that virus — but kept getting sick

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A team of scientists wants to accelerate research into a genetic disorder by using CRISPR to copy unique mutations from affected children into pigs

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More than 116,000 Americans are waiting to receive an organ transplant, and about 20 die each day during the wait. Scientists are eager to find solutions to the organ shortage

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