Years after research contradicts common practices, patients continue to demand them and doctors continue to deliver. The result is an epidemic of unnecessary and unhelpful treatment

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A common belief is that opioid addiction often begins with a single prescription from a doctor: Patients seek relief from some minor problem like a toothache or back pain, leave with a prescription, and wind up hooked. But there’s not much actual evidence tying doctors’ prescription patterns with individual patients’ long-term use of opioids or complications caused by the drugs later on

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Encouraging physicians to try to get glowing reviews may skew treatment in unhealthy ways

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The quest for firm answers is not what medicine is all about

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One of the more surprising — and genuinely scary — research papers published recently appeared in JAMA Internal Medicine. It examined 10 years of data involving tens of thousands of hospital admissions. It found that patients with acute, life-threatening cardiac conditions did better when the senior cardiologists were out of town

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Some doctors blame patient pressure because they are concerned their children will be exposed to dangerous diseases

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For decades, first-year medical students have had to cram the details of the Krebs cycle into their heads. Now the biomedical model of educating doctors, based largely on a century-old document called The Flexner Report, is coming under fire

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Difficult Environments

September 12, 2014

In our ongoing #nursingethics video series: We asked nurses to describe environments where nurses are unable to practice ethically. This is what they told us…

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