Who is your emergency contact? The answer to that question, standard in every doctor’s office, has now been used to predict the role of genes in hundreds of conditions, from diabetes to high cholesterol

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Predicting the next pandemic is tricky work. When the newborn piglets first started getting sick in October 2016, farmers in China’s Guangdong province suspected porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) — a disease they’d seen in the pigs before. And, at first, the tests did come back positive for PEDV. But then something strange happened. By January 2017, the pigs stopped testing positive for that virus — but kept getting sick

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But it might not be smart to take one. Scientists have linked hundreds of genes to intelligence. One psychologist says it’s time to test school kids

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Mass thought control may not be on the cards just yet, but mind-reading tech is developing fast. We need to be prepared

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Many studies that link global warming to civil unrest are biased and exacerbate stigma about the developing world

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Here’s why that’s a good thing. A new algorithm could ease critically ill patients’ final days.

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By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 percent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion

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Creativity is often defined as the ability to come up with new and useful ideas. Like intelligence, it can be considered a trait that everyone – not just creative “geniuses” like Picasso and Steve Jobs – possesses in some capacity

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