Julie Kim writes, “I now had two children, but was only just beginning to understand what it means to be a parent”

Quick Read

There are 111,616 incarcerated women in the US, a 7-fold increase since 1980. Some of these women are pregnant, but amid reports of women giving birth in their cells or shackled to hospital beds, prison and public health officials have no hard data on how many are pregnant, or on the outcomes of those pregnancies

Quick Read

Anne Drapkin Lyerly, a bioethicist and obstetrician, said that there is a deep-seated norm to leave pregnant women out of clinical trials, reinforced by policies that have classified them as “vulnerable” and institutional rules that have made it easier to avoid considering the ­potential risks and benefits altogether

Quick Read

Carleigh Krubiner, faculty member at the Berman Institute, said in a statement.“The DRC’s decision to extend Ebola vaccine coverage to pregnant women is a huge step forward, not only for pregnant women in areas affected by outbreaks but for all pregnant women who may face the threat of Ebola in the future”

Quick Read

Women, especially pregnant women, are frequently excluded from immunisation programmes. The reasoning is often flawed—and the consequences can be fatal – with comments from our Carleigh Krubiner

Quick Read

On March 7, 2016, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic introduced the nation to Lindsey McFarland, the first person to undergo a successful uterus transplant in the US. Within hours, however, McFarland was back in surgery: A life-threatening infection forced the organ’s removal, crushing hope she might one day give birth

Quick Read

“The cost of doing this research versus the cost of essentially denying women access to something that could be highly beneficial, there’s really no comparison.”, says our Carleigh Krubiner, coauthor of a recent report on maternal immunization

Quick Read

Ruth Karron, Carleigh Krubiner, and Ruth Faden write, “As health officials work to contain the continuing outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo, lessons from that crisis can be applied to more equitably battle Lassa fever, another deadly infectious disease.”

Quick Read