An ethics group stresses the importance of including the disease’s most vulnerable population in clinical trials

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Researchers tracked prescriptions and pill use in 179 women discharged from an academic medical center after cesarean delivery. On average, they left the hospital with a prescription for the equivalent of 30 pills containing 5 milligrams of oxycodone or hydrocodone

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Five percent of pregnant women with a confirmed Zika infection in the United States territories, including Puerto Rico, went on to have a baby with a related birth defect, according to the most comprehensive report to date from federal officials

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Reconsider having kids. “Having children is a sacred cow in most countries,” Travis Rieder, Research Scholar at the John Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics tells SBS about the unpopularity for moral or policy discussion of this issue. “However, we aren’t living in normal times, in which we have the luxury of discussing only ‘easy’ environmental options.”

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Back in the 1960s, a woman doctor in Japan created a powerful drug to help mothers who hemorrhage after childbirth. The medicine is inexpensive to make. Safe to use. And stops bleeding quickly by helping keep naturally forming blood clots intact

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Micaela Delgado is a beautiful dark-eyed baby girl with a ready smile. She’s eight months old. She’s one of more than 1,000 babies already born in Puerto Rico to mothers with Zika

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Before the virus overwhelmed Puerto Rico, Zika already lurked in Keishla Mojica’s home. First her partner, John Rodríguez, 23, became infected. His face swelled and a red, itchy rash covered his body. Doctors at the time diagnosed it as an allergy. Two months later, Mojica, 23, had the same symptoms. Medics administered shots of Benadryl to soothe the rash and inflammation. She didn’t give it much more thought

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Babies born to Zika-infected mothers are highly likely to have brain damage, even in the absence of obvious abnormalities like small heads, and the virus may go on replicating in their brains well after birth, according to three studies published Tuesday

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