Several years ago, British entomologist Steve Lindsay landed at an American airport and was immediately struck by all the furry creatures walking around the baggage claim area

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News of the latest Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is an urgent reminder that we need to change the way we fight disease, and we need to do so now

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Global health officials say, ‘They did it all wrong’

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State financial regulators in New York said Wednesday that they would investigate reports that gay men have been denied insurance policies covering life, disability or long-term care because they were taking medication to protect themselves against HIV

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Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an HIV-positive patient for surgery. Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-HIV drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting HIV through sex

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In recent years, doctors have found convincing evidence that low doses of ketamine, a drug used by doctors and veterinarians for its anesthetic properties and by sensation-seekers for its psychedelic effects, might represent an genuine advance in treating depression. A new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that ketamine could also be effective as a fast-acting treatment to prevent suicide

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A bacterium called Wolbachia could stop the bloodsucking insects from spreading diseases like Zika and dengue fever

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