State financial regulators in New York said Wednesday that they would investigate reports that gay men have been denied insurance policies covering life, disability or long-term care because they were taking medication to protect themselves against HIV

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Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an HIV-positive patient for surgery. Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-HIV drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting HIV through sex

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In recent years, doctors have found convincing evidence that low doses of ketamine, a drug used by doctors and veterinarians for its anesthetic properties and by sensation-seekers for its psychedelic effects, might represent an genuine advance in treating depression. A new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that ketamine could also be effective as a fast-acting treatment to prevent suicide

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A bacterium called Wolbachia could stop the bloodsucking insects from spreading diseases like Zika and dengue fever

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The Kindled Brain

October 3, 2017

If each bout of depression, bipolar disorder or PTSD makes another more likely, should sufferers stay on medication for life?

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After his son’s suicide aged 18, Steve Mallen sees the world differently. Along with a growing number of mental health experts, he wants to reduce the rate of suicide across the world, and is aiming for zero. Simon Usborne finds out more

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HPV-related oral and genital cancers are on the rise — yet we’re under-using the vaccine that can prevent them

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