In April, Gundy’s child, who is on private insurance, began getting the drug Spinraza, which costs $750,000 for the initial year of treatment. Chaffin’s child — a Medicaid enrollee — was not receiving the drug, as his state regulators debated whether to offer it to children like him who use ventilators to breathe

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Marshall Allen: After I was prescribed a brand-name drug I didn’t need and given a coupon to cover the out-of-pocket costs, I discovered another reason Americans pay too much for health care.

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Now, drug industry players are feuding over the windfall. Amid public concern over spiking drug prices, a powerful middleman is suing a tiny drugmaker over unpaid rebates and fees. The maker calls the suit baseless; analysts say the suit offers a window into an opaque world

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Spencer Phillips Hey: People who volunteer to participate in clinical trials of new drugs provide a valuable service to pharmaceutical companies and to the rest of us. In return, I think that they should have a say in how much these drugs will cost when they hit the market. Not only would that honor their service, but it would also provide a patient-centered mechanism to lower the price of new drugs

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Dr. Cathleen London: “I basically build an auto-injector. I can do it for pediatric and adult dosing,” she said. “I found the right syringe. I put in the dose that I wanted. Whether it’s expired or used, people come back and refill it.”

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Between 2002 and 2013, the price of insulin more than tripled, to more than $700 per patient. A federal lawsuit accuses the three insulin manufacturers of conspiring to raise their prices. The drug makers deny the allegations

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As it readies for battle with President Trump over drug prices, the pharmaceutical industry is deploying economists and health care experts from the nation’s top universities. In scholarly articles, blogs and conferences, they lend their prestige to the lobbying blitz, without always disclosing their corporate ties

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The latest flashpoint in the ongoing debate over high drug prices is Emflaza, an $89,000-a-year drug that treats Duchenne muscular dystrophy

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