What one city did to fight high drug prices reveals a drug supply chain in which just about every link can benefit when prices go up

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It was 2015 when Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals and the notorious “pharma bro,” jacked up the cost of the lifesaving drug Daraprim by 5,000 percent. Overnight, its price tag skyrocketed from $13.50 a pill to $750

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“I did not ask how much it cost – it never crossed my mind, ever,” said Soloviev, a former French teacher, who still works part time. Then the bill came

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb isn’t rolling back his agency’s mission, although he is straddling the interests of the drug and health industries along with public health

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Facing bipartisan hostility over high drug prices in an election year, the pharma industry’s biggest trade group boosted revenue by nearly a fourth last year and spread the millions collected among hundreds of lobbyists, politicians and patient groups, new filings show

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In April, Gundy’s child, who is on private insurance, began getting the drug Spinraza, which costs $750,000 for the initial year of treatment. Chaffin’s child — a Medicaid enrollee — was not receiving the drug, as his state regulators debated whether to offer it to children like him who use ventilators to breathe

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Marshall Allen: After I was prescribed a brand-name drug I didn’t need and given a coupon to cover the out-of-pocket costs, I discovered another reason Americans pay too much for health care.

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Now, drug industry players are feuding over the windfall. Amid public concern over spiking drug prices, a powerful middleman is suing a tiny drugmaker over unpaid rebates and fees. The maker calls the suit baseless; analysts say the suit offers a window into an opaque world

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