Effy Vayena and Alessandro Blasimme write, “In January 1999, Scott McNealy, CEO of Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle Corporation), announced that we should no longer be concerned with privacy, since consumers ‘have zero privacy anyway’ and should just ‘get over it.’”

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Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab are working with Facebook to develop breakthrough brain-computer interface technologies

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Johns Hopkins leaders sent a message to the JHU and Hopkins Medicine communities today about an upcoming HBO film, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The film is based on the best-selling book about the life of a woman who was treated for cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s

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As doctors and health professionals take to public spaces like Twitter and Facebook to curate and create we face new challenges. One of the challenges is how to disclose our relationship to the organizations and products. How do we disclose conflict of interest in so many different kinds of venues?

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Investigators find many examples of unprofessional, ‘potentially objectionable’ behavior online. The study is not the first to bring attention to doctors’ social media use. The issue has been on the medical profession’s radar for a while, said Dr. Matthew DeCamp, of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore

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From 2009 to 2016 healthcare providers reported 1,225 of the total 1,798 data breaches in the United States, researchers at Michigan State University report

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A bill is moving through Congress—the Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act—that would effectively allow businesses to require their employees to disclose lots of sensitive medical data, including their genetic information

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Familial searching allows investigators to look through databases with wider parameters to identify people who are most likely close relatives of the person who may have committed a crime. But the method has raised ethical questions. Many see it as an invasion of privacy that draws an innocent group of people — and their DNA — into criminal inquiries based on their blood relation to a suspect or someone convicted of a crime

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