Ideally, speaking up shouldn’t be a problem. But sometimes you have to tread carefully

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When a woman gets her genome sequenced, questions about privacy arise for her identical twin sister

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The tragic death of former Adelaide Crows’ coach Phil Walsh, killed by his son Cy suffering from a mental illness, has highlighted the difficulties faced by families of those with mental health issues

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if only we could be motivated to use them. Those are the conclusions of two new studies about the promise and perils of relying on fitness trackers to measure and guide how we move

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A cybersecurity expert tackles breast cancer and data privacy

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And then get you fired. The benefits of such a system seem obvious. Algorithms would piece together clues from doctor, hospital and drugstore claims, as well as other information such as social media postings, and alert physicians if it appears that a patient is at greater risk of a disease or a chronic condition. But questions remain about safeguarding people’s privacy and how such information might be used

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Digital gizmos can monitor your heart, whether it’s a wrist-worn fitness tracker or a smartphone app to help cardiologists analyze diagnostic tests. The question is whether they’re going to do your heart any good. The short answer: It depends

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Carissa Véliz (University of Oxford) warns us: we should act now before it is too late. Privacy damages accumulate, and, in many cases, are irreversible. We urgently need more regulations to protect our privacy

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