When entities such as health plans and health care providers handle personal health information, they are often subject to data privacy regulation. But amid a flood of new forms of health data, some third parties have figured out ways to avoid some data privacy laws, developing what we call “shadow health records”

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In managing vast databases of genetic information, the NIH has something to learn from Facebook

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Even if you aren’t on Twitter. Companies have made billions of dollars by turning everything we say, do, and look at online into an experiment in consumer profiling. Recently, some users have had enough, curtailing their use of social media or deleting their accounts completely. But that’s no guarantee of privacy

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Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records — which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information. That’s creating both opportunities and spurring privacy concerns. Here’s what to know (Video)

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This Apple Watch includes new features designed to detect falls and heart problems. With descriptions like “part guardian, part guru” and “designed to improve your health … and powerful enough to protect it,” the tech giant signaled its move toward preventive health and a much wider demographic

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This year, an estimated 6 million workers worldwide will receive wearable fitness trackers as part of workplace wellness programs. That’s up from about 2 million in 2016, according to ABI Research, a market research firm

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The FDA on Wednesday cleared the first DNA test meant to be marketed directly to consumers to help them determine how well certain drugs may work for them. The test was developed by 23andMe and, as with other tests from the consumer genetics giant, customers will be able to simply mail in a spit sample to get results

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Most of what we do — the websites we visit, the places we go, the TV shows we watch, the products we buy — has become fair game for advertisers. Now, thanks to internet-connected devices in the home like smart thermometers, ads we see may be determined by something even more personal: our health

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