Discovering and designing a new drug is one of the most challenging tasks in the biological sciences. It takes over 10 years and about US$2.6 billion to bring an average drug to market

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That people would generally prefer to minimize casualties in a hypothetical autonomous car crash has been found to be true in past research, but what happens when people are presented with more complex scenarios?

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In Tempe, Arizona, an autonomous Uber struck and killed a woman crossing a street at night. The incident is likely to test the public’s tolerance of AVs on real-world roads

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Joshua Brown was just one of the more than 37,000 people who died in car crashes in the US last year—but his death continues to make headlines. Brown became the first person killed by an autonomous vehicle when his Tesla Model S collided with a truck while in Autopilot mode

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Ethical decisions have to be programmed into autonomous cars, like whether to always save the driver or to prevent injury to others on the road. Nicholas Evans is working to find those answers

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Pain in the Machine

July 17, 2017

Pain leads to empathy and self-preservation: should we make robots ‘feel’ it?

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Bioethics with Jeffrey Kahn

December 15, 2016

Host, Tom Hall is joined by Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, the director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. He stops by Midday from time to time to talk about how ethicists help us frame the questions we need to ask when we are confronted with new research possibilities, or new advances in science and technology. Today’s topic: Autonomous cars.

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Our artificial intelligence systems are advancing at a remarkable rate, and though it will be some time before we have human-like synthetic intelligence, it makes sense to begin working on programming morality now. And researchers at Duke University are already well on their way

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