Escaping the great plague of London (1665-1666). In the end, somewhere between 25%-50% of the population of London died as a result of the plague during 1665-1666. With everyone dropping like flies and nobody knowing what was causing the plague in the first place, this lead to some interesting methods of preventing its spread

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A new study suggests there was a better way to respond to the Ebola outbreak

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Bill that would prohibit parents from not vaccinating their kids passes state senate

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What would make a smoker more likely to quit, a big reward for succeeding or a little penalty for failing? That is what researchers wanted to know when they assigned a large group of CVS employees, their relatives and friends to different smoking cessation programs

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Public health expert Stephanie Morain, a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, said Cisna’s story can be used to help people consider healthier options at fast food restaurants, but that doesn’t mean his experiment will work for everyone as a weight loss plan

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A study released Monday offers some comfort, finding that when hospitals shut down, death rates and other markers of quality generally don’t worsen

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When Bruce Hodgins went to the doctor for a checkup in Sioux City, Iowa, he was asked to complete a lengthy survey to gauge his health risks. In return for filling it out, he saved a $10 monthly premium for his Medicaid coverage

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In late 2012, Agnes Binagwaho, Rwanda’s Minister of Health, realized her country’s key health enemy was something far more innocuous. The thing causing the most harm to her people, the leading risk factor for premature death and disability, was inside their own homes: Dirty indoor air, from cooking food over burning dung and vegetation in poorly ventilated huts

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