An injured bioethicist learned firsthand how desperately patients with severe pain need the relief of powerful drugs—and how little support they get to stop taking them. Our Travis Rieder shares an essay adapted from his forthcoming book ‘In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids’

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The Ebola virus that has stubbornly lingered in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) since August 2018 has finally jumped the border, sickening a 5-year-old boy in Uganda

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The outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the most deadly in history, and despite a slowing spread, public health experts say the situation isn’t likely to get better. Why?

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“We weren’t happy when a billboard went up saying marijuana laws reduce overdose deaths,” said Brendan Saloner of Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics & Bloomberg School of Public Health. “That was very hard for us to rein in.”

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Ten years after swine flu, no one can predict the next one

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Across the nation, public health departments are redirecting scarce resources to try to control the spread of measles. Their success relies on shoe-leather detective work that is one of the great untold costs of the measles resurgence

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Just 50 years ago, some 1,000 small and family-owned seed companies were producing and distributing seeds in the United States; by 2009, there were fewer than 100. Thanks to a series of mergers and acquisitions over the last few years, four multinational agrochemical firms now control over 60 percent of global seed sales

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Some drug users say that as long as the lifesaving drug is around, they don’t worry as much about dying

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