The first “test-tube baby” made headlines around the world in 1978, setting off intense debate on the ethics of researching human embryos and reproductive technologies. Every breakthrough since then has raised the same questions about “designer babies” and “playing God” – but public response has grown more subdued rather than more engaged as technologies have become increasingly sophisticated and powerful

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A guest blog from Matt Donne, PhD: It was during winter break of my Junior year in college that the gap between the general public’s understanding of embryonic stem cell biology and the reality of that research quickly came into focus for me

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Ohio’s Republican-led legislature passed a law on Tuesday making abortion illegal once a fetal heartbeat can be detected (typically at about six weeks’ gestation). The bill is awaiting a signature from Republican Gov. John Kasich and has divided anti-abortion activists — some support it, but others fear the bill would not withstand a court challenge

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The science says: perhaps. Climate change is a major public health threat, already making existing problems like asthma, exposure to extreme heat, food poisoning, and infectious disease more severe, and posing new risks from climate change-related disasters, including death or injury

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Acceptance of science has become increasingly polarized in the United States. Indeed, a recent Pew poll shows that there is a substantial and growing amount of public disagreement about basic scientific facts, including human evolution, the safety of vaccines and whether or not human-caused climate change is real and happening. What is causing this, you might ask?

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“Death is nothing at all,” the English theologian Henry Scott Holland wrote a century ago in a reflection that is often quoted at funerals. Death is but life extended, Holland said: “I have only slipped away to the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was.”

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