Tweet Revenge

June 14, 2017

Attendees at the American Diabetes Association’s Scientific Sessions in San Diego this year — many of them young researchers who are active on social media — were surprised to be greeted with the following: “Thanks for joining us at #2017ADA! Photography isn’t allowed during presentations — we’d appreciate it if you’d delete this tweet.”

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All it took was one paragraph. In 1980, a pair of doctors published a brief letter in the New England Journal of Medicine. Spanning a total of five sentences, the letter claimed, with little substantial evidence, that the development of addiction was very rare in hospitalized patients who briefly received opioids and had no prior history of addiction

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The scale of “fake research” in the UK appears to have been underestimated, a BBC investigation suggests

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That is about to change. On January 1st, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation brought into force a policy, foreshadowed two years earlier, that research it supports must, when published, be freely available to all. On March 23rd it followed this up by announcing that it will pay the cost of putting such research in one particular repository of freely available papers

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In many scientific fields, women publish fewer papers than men, are less likely to be listed as first authors and are less likely to receive glowing letters of recommendation from their advisers. These disparities have decreased over time, but they persist. Now, a study finds that some journal editors might be inadvertently taking gender into account when selecting reviewers for papers.

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Study published in Liver International examined the outcomes of 564 transplantations at Zhejiang University’s First Affiliated hospital in China

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Academics vet the work of their peers — for free, in their spare time — in a process that is supposed to weed out junk science before it’s published. But researchers say the task is thankless, that it slows down the publication process. To make matters worse, this cornerstone of the scientific method has surprisingly little evidence for its effectiveness, and many mysteries about how it works

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The University of Tokyo today announced it is launching an investigation into anonymously made claims of fabricated and falsified data appearing in 22 papers by six university research groups. An individual or group going by the name “Ordinary_researchers” detailed questions about data and graphs in more than 100 pages delivered to the university in two batches on 14 and 29 August

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