J. Marion Sims’s advances in medical science were made through experimentation on enslaved women

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Tim Caulfield writes, “After what feels like a decade of hype and underwhelming sales, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing seems to be taking off, for better or worse. In the hope of discovering more about themselves, millions of people have sent DNA-filled tubes of spit to commercial testing companies”

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But signing up black patients for clinical trials will be a hard sell. The first attempts to use a groundbreaking gene-editing technology in people will likely target patients with sickle cell disease, a crippling inherited disorder that in the U.S. predominantly strikes African-Americans

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About 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease (formerly known as sickle cell anemia). Most of them are black. And many of them have faced challenges from the health care industry in getting their condition addressed

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Black Mothers Are Dying

January 12, 2018

The toll of racism on maternal health. The recent, high-profile death of Erica Garner, a 27-year-old African-American mother of two — one of them a 4-month-old infant — is a tragic example of how racism and access to health care for black mothers is a national crisis

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Not education. Not income. Not even being an expert on racial disparities in health care

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Belonging

September 26, 2017

Longtime Baltimore Ravens fan, and composer of ‘Unseen’, via the JHU Exploration of Practical Ethics Program, Judah Adashi, continues his reflections on not watching NFL football in 2017 and the ethics of fandom in 21st century America

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Poor and minority patients receive less optimal pain management, are placed on enhanced recovery protocols later than wealthier, white counterparts

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