Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the U.S.(other than non-melanoma skin cancer) and one of the most deadly. It’s especially deadly for black men, who are more likely to get it and twice as likely as white men to die from it. Yet black men tend to be underrepresented in research for prostate cancer treatment

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Scientists are allowed to conduct these experiments without obtaining consent from each individual participant because they are testing emergency medical procedures, and often the patients physically can’t respond

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Improved treatment has nearly tripled viral suppression rates among HIV patients in the United States over the past two decades, researchers report. But viral suppression rates remain lower among young people and black Americans, the researchers add

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California teenager Jahi McMath, who suffered catastrophic brain injury as a result of a routine tonsil surgery, died on June 22, 2018. Her death came after four years of her family fighting in court to continue her care in California. Eventually, they moved her to a facility in New Jersey, a state that accommodates religious views that don’t recognize brain death

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Funding is harder to find in general, and the current approach favors low-risk research and proposals by older scientists and white men

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Racial disparities in health outcomes are complicated, but this is one place to start. (Featuring our Mary Catherine Beach)

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The answer to the disparity in death rates has everything to do with the lived experience of being a black woman in America

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Tim Caulfield writes, “After what feels like a decade of hype and underwhelming sales, direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing seems to be taking off, for better or worse. In the hope of discovering more about themselves, millions of people have sent DNA-filled tubes of spit to commercial testing companies”

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