Clinical trials in the United States have been plagued for years by two well-known problems: They don’t recruit enough people and they fail to reflect the diversity of our nation. The good news is that solving the diversity problem can resolve both issues. Two birds, one stone

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The All of Us study run by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, has recruited 143,000 participants who have already taken surveys and visited a clinic to give blood and urine samples. Another 87,000 have at least registered for the study

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A quiet but revolutionary new nat’l health policy goes into effect this week, ushering in changes that could lead to important medical discoveries that benefit most Americans. One problem. Implementing the change will require that our country’s health researchers make some fundamental changes in how they do business

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Participants in medical research are more empowered than ever to influence the design and outcomes of experiments. Now, researchers are trying to keep up

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In 2016, as the mosquito-borne Zika virus spread through the Americas and cases of infected women having brain-damaged babies mounted, investigators raced to develop a vaccine. Now, a $110 million vaccine trial is underway at 17 sites in nine countries, but it faces an unexpected, and ironic, challenge

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In the summer of 2015, Alexandra Franco got a letter in the mail from a company she had never heard of called AcurianHealth. The letter, addressed to Franco personally, invited her to participate in a study of people with psoriasis, a condition that causes dry, itchy patches on the skin

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There is an outcry in the United States that we’re facing an urgent nurse deficit that threatens the safety of individual patients and the nation’s health as a whole

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In a setback for efforts to treat Ebola, an experimental drug that researchers had considered one of the most promising potential treatments has not worked in patients in Sierra Leone, the drug’s developer said Friday

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