But signing up black patients for clinical trials will be a hard sell. The first attempts to use a groundbreaking gene-editing technology in people will likely target patients with sickle cell disease, a crippling inherited disorder that in the U.S. predominantly strikes African-Americans

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Johnson & Johnson uses the prospect of jail time to market a schizophrenia drug

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Human eggs have been grown in the laboratory for the first time, say researchers at the University of Edinburgh. The team say the technique could lead to new ways of preserving the fertility of children having cancer treatment

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Optpgenetics 2.0

February 8, 2018

Brain control goes wireless via light, sound, or a drug

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The National Science Foundation says institutions it supports must disclose when researchers are found to have violated policies or are put on leave pending investigation

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A genomics startup co-founded by George Church emerged from stealth mode on Wednesday, proclaiming that blockchain, the technology that underlies transactions of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, will help people understand their genome, find cures for (unspecified) diseases, and, unlike most existing genomics companies, guarantee that individuals will retain permanent ownership of their DNA data

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About 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease (formerly known as sickle cell anemia). Most of them are black. And many of them have faced challenges from the health care industry in getting their condition addressed

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A new working group will develop guidelines for determining whether moving the primates to sanctuaries is harmful to their health

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