Study participants share their blood and spit in the name of biomedical research. Now, a national group of experts says these volunteers should be told what scientists learn about their health from those samples

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The practice of conducting ethically dubious research in foreign countries is under fresh scrutiny

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Prominent University of Illinois at Chicago psychiatrist enrolled her young sons as healthy control subjects in troubled study

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There is a general shortage of information about the safety of medications used during pregnancy—largely because any woman who is pregnant, was recently pregnant, or might get pregnant is barred from participating in most of the clinical trials that evaluate drug safety and efficacy

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There are now several experimental treatments vying to be tested, but each must be greenlit by national regulatory authorities whenever and wherever an outbreak occurs. There remain deeply divergent positions among scientists about how to design outbreak trials, specifically whether studies that don’t compare treatments to placebos can generate useful data

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Leading scientists propose to track salt’s effects on health by controlling how much is given to inmate volunteers

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On May 6, the “All of Us” study started enrolling participants. This national study will be one of the largest ever examining the connection between genetics, behavior and medical outcomes, with a goal of 1 million or more participants. Anyone over the age of 18 in the U.S. can join

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Vulnerable groups, such as children, prisoners and people with limited mental capacity, are usually excluded from drug trials. And, until quite recently, it was considered unethical to test drugs on pregnant women, too… But the tide is turning

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