Hospitals should require patients to give explicit informed consent before physicians are authorized to discuss life-and-death matters with them offsite via technology

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When Patterson got to the hospital, there was a security guard blocking the door. The facility was on lockdown after receiving several victims from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Earlier that day, a gunman had opened fire at the school — killing 17 people and injuring another 17

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Why taking care in discharging a patient matters

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Racial disparities in health outcomes are complicated, but this is one place to start. (Featuring our Mary Catherine Beach)

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We have seen a rush for human remains before. More than a century ago, anthropologists were eager to assemble collections of skeletons. They were building a science of humanity and needed samples of skulls and bones to determine evolutionary history and define the characteristics of human races

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The searing abdominal pain came on suddenly while Dr. Rana Awdish was having dinner with a friend. Soon she was lying in the back seat of the car racing to Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, where Awdish was completing a fellowship in critical care

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In a continuing study of negative experiences during awake procedures, a patient informed University of Chicago researchers, “The surgeon told me he was going to get a sharper knife, and started laughing.” As a heads-up to staff members, some hospitals now post warning signs on the O.R. door: PATIENT AWAKE

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Should the Irish Giant be allowed to rest in peace? That’s the question swirling around the bones of Charles Byrne, a literal giant who was an 18th century celebrity. His skeleton is on public display today at a London museum. In this case, Byrne was very clear about what he wanted, Kahn says. “It wasn’t to display him in a museum. And I wonder what the value of continuing to display his skeleton actually is. Is there more to be learned?”

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