Upshot asked 30 experts to think big, but realistically, about solutions. Imagine you had $100 billion to spend over five years — a little less than current federal domestic H.I.V./AIDS spending — to address the opioid crisis. Where would you put that money?

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There’s a glaring hole in President Trump’s budget proposal for 2019, global health researchers say. A US program to help other countries beef up their ability to detect pathogens around the world will lose a significant portion of its funding

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Lance Gable: As an expert in public health law, I can state two things with confidence. First, the US has made enormous strides in preparing for and treating the flu. And second, we still are not nearly as prepared as we need to be for the next pandemic

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A century after one of history’s most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to guard against another super-flu like the 1918 influenza that killed tens of millions as it swept the globe

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Changing minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn’t so important when a law can change behavior

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AS A FOURTH year medical student at Yale, Matthew Erlendson says he had to think long and hard about whether to participate in a recent hackathon at the Department of Health and Human services

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Dr. Adnan Hyder hopes the program can have as big an impact on public health policy in Afghanistan as it has in Pakistan. “To me, the fundamental innovation here is to stop the … brain drain,” said Hyder, adding that all trainees from Afghanistan will be asked to do work that will not only contribute to their degrees but also to the important policies around injury and trauma in their country

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With the country in the throes of an epidemic, communities across the nation are being forced to confront the harrowing, and often fatal, effects of opioid abuse. But solutions — such as creating intervention programs in Ohio, providing access to treatment in Alabama, or investing in prevention initiatives in Missouri — cost money

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