The outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is among the most deadly in history, and despite a slowing spread, public health experts say the situation isn’t likely to get better. Why?

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Researchers have analysed anonymized phone records of tens of millions of people in low-income countries. Critics question whether the benefits outweigh the risks

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An Ebola outbreak in eastern Congo — the second-largest in history — is escalating in part because locals don’t trust health workers and government officials

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“The violence is directly connected to the inability to get the epidemic under control,” said our Leonard Rubenstein, “It’s an unrecognized problem, Anybody concerned with global health needs to … recognize what a threat this is to people all around the world and to us as well when epidemics can’t be stopped because of violence.”

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“This is where we think machine learning has the great opportunity to help us,” said Dr. Daniel Cantillon, a cardiologist who serves as medical director of the CMU. “The challenge is we have to be able to call our shots in advance, and that’s something we’re deeply invested in”

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Jeremy Farrar writes ‘First isolated in Malaysia in 1999, Nipah virus rapidly went from unknown to endemic in Bangladesh, which has seen an outbreak almost every year since 2001. Large gaps remain in our understanding, however, such as how the virus crossed India to spark an epidemic…’

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The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is experiencing the second largest Ebola outbreak in history. This week has been the worst by far, with more than 100 new cases in the last 5 days. Since the outbreak began last summer, there have been more than 1,500 cases, with just over 1,000 deaths

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Doctors at the epicenter of Congo’s Ebola crisis are threatening to go on strike indefinitely if health workers are attacked again. The march on Wednesday comes after a Cameroon national working for the World Health Organization was killed last week on assignment in eastern Congo

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