Members of a government ethics panel have renewed their criticisms of a controversial study in which volunteers are to be deliberately infected with the Zika virus

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Interventions such as speeding enforcement and formal swimming lessons for young children could potentially save more than 250,000 lives a year if they were implemented across populations living in extreme poverty in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, including our Adnan Hyder

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Review in the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal of ‘Toward a Small Family Ethic’ by our Travis Rieder

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Does ‘Rampage’ get the science of CRISPR right?

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The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients

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Judith Garber and Shannon Brownlee: While the top-ranked hospitals were patting themselves on the back, we wondered if the magazine’s ranking system actually measures what matters to patients, or for that matter to anybody who is worried about the cost and quality of US health care. So we took a closer look at how U.S. News measures hospital quality and—just as important—what factors its analysis leaves out

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Review concludes drugs, costing £30k per patient, hailed as cure for potentially fatal liver disease may clear virus from blood, but there is no evidence they prevent harm or save lives

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This was the proposal: Deliberately infect a small group of consenting adults with the Zika virus to learn about the disease and speed up the search for a vaccine. The need is clear. Zika is an emerging global threat to public health. The disease can be devastating, especially for the babies of mothers who catch it while pregnant

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