Indiana expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act in 2015, adding conditions designed to appeal to the state’s conservative leadership. The federal government approved the experiment, called the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, which is now up for a three-year renewal. But a close reading of the state’s renewal application shows that misleading and inaccurate information is being used to justify extending HIP 2.0

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Reshma Ramachandran and our Zackary Berger voice concerns about the impact of the 21st Century Cures Act on the FDA should it become law

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When I started out as a doctor in 1999, the IOM published a blockbuster report that declared that up to 98,000 people were dying in US hospitals each year as a result of preventable medical errors. Just a few months ago, a study in the BMJ declared that number has now risen to more than 250,000, making preventable medical errors in hospitals the third-largest cause of death in the country in 2013

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The National Institutes of Health is deciding whether to consider funding controversial experiments involving scientists using human stem cells to create embryos that are part human, part animal

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Chances are, you’re on Facebook right now. About 1.7 billion people—almost a quarter of the world’s population—actively use the social media platform . And though it’s free, Facebook isn’t charity. It has a product, and that product is you and me. The company cleared a tidy $5.2 billion from user-directed ads in the first quarter of 2016 alone

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Burned by negative reviews, some health providers are casting their patients’ privacy aside and sharing intimate details online as they try to rebut criticism. In the course of these arguments — which have spilled out publicly on ratings sites like Yelp — doctors, dentists, chiropractors and massage therapists, among others, have divulged details of patients’ diagnoses, treatments and idiosyncrasies

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Things sometimes go wrong with airbags, food and drugs, prompting recalls. It can also happen with medical devices, though you’d think lifesaving devices like heart defibrillators or artificial hips would be closely monitored. But the data needed to systematically and rapidly identify dangerous medical devices are not routinely collected in the United States

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Harding’s website Lab Scribbles is a test to see if this idea could work. There, Harding is publishing her lab notes on the structure of Huntington proteins in real time. She hopes the transparency will encourage others in the field to collaborate with her, correct her when she’s wrong, and, most importantly, help bring science up to the speed of the internet age

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