Lawmakers could help some stay open. The decline of rural hospitals has been a slow-moving train wreck. It’s now accelerating

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An obscure Obamacare provision forces rural hospitals to pay full price for drugs that many bigger hospitals buy at deeply discounted rates

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The report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows parents of teenagers are in the main following the CDC’s advice and keeping their children up to date on vaccines that should be administered in the early teens

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Early last year, executives at a small hospital an hour north of Spokane, Wash., started using a company called EmCare to staff and run their emergency room. The hospital had been struggling to find doctors to work in its E.R., and turning to EmCare was something hundreds of other hospitals across the country had done. That’s when the trouble began

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Williamson has some of West Virginia’s highest rates of obesity, disability, and arthritis — in a state that already ranks among the worst in those categories. An adult in Williamson has twice the chance of dying from an injury as the average American. This is why the opioid crisis is so hard to handle, here and in so many communities: The underlying drugs are often being prescribed for real reasons

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The emerging crisis is driven by low wages — around $10 an hour, mostly funded by state Medicaid programs — and a shrinking pool of workers willing to perform this physically and emotionally demanding work

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Thirty years ago, a law was passed to ensure hospitals treated women in labor. Inspection reports show that doesn’t always happen, especially at rural hospitals that have eliminated obstetric units

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The simple fact of where you live can have a huge impact on your health

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