Religious exemptions for vaccinations are no longer available. With the start of the school year, some parents face a reckoning

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All U.S. states require most parents to vaccinate their children against some preventable diseases, including measles, mumps, rubella and whooping cough, to be able to attend school. Such laws often apply to children in private schools and day care facilities as well as public schools

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For at least two decades, the New York City Housing Authority routinely disputed tests that revealed lead in its apartments. Private landlords almost never do this

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In the days after her son Graham hanged himself in his dormitory room at Hamilton College, Gina Burton went about settling his affairs in a blur of efficiency, her grief tinged with a nagging sense that something did not add up

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Changing minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn’t so important when a law can change behavior

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Under the expert guidance of Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, Marjorie Cook Professor of Law, the students spent 13 intense weeks exploring the ethical, legal, social, and policy issues raised by genomics research

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A growing student population has been using them as “study” drugs – that help them stay up all night and concentrate. According to a 2007 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study, abuse of nonmedical prescription drugs among college students, such as ADHD meds, increased from 8.3 percent in 1996 to 14.6 percent in 2006

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What happens when we receive a medical directive that requires that we do not resuscitate one of our students? Do we allow students whose parents have given a directive saying “Do Not Attempt Resuscitation” (DNAR) to die at school? How do we reconcile this ethical dilemma of serving the best interests of our students when they face impending death?

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