In 2009, an influential panel of medical experts ignited a nationwide uproar by suggesting that women needed fewer mammograms than had long been recommended. Outrage ensued. On Monday, the same panel issued an update of its guidelines — and it is sticking to its guns. The basic advice, which applies to women with an average risk of breast cancer, was unchanged

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An analysis recently published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ) is not a condemnation of cancer screening itself. It’s more a condemnation of how we present cancer screening

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False beliefs and wishful thinking about the human experience are common. They are hurting people — and holding back science

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A Change of Mind

December 16, 2015

Diana Bianchi championed tests that find Down syndrome early in pregnancy. Now can she find a way to treat it?

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Treating Hep C isn’t cheap, but experts say it’s cost-effective

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Pigeons, with training, did just as well as humans in a study testing their ability to distinguish cancerous from healthy breast tissue samples. The birds were rewarded with food pellets when they correctly identified tumor samples. The pigeons were able to generalize what they learned, correctly spotting tumors in unseen microscope images

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The online tool, called Breast Screening Decisions, grew out of a blog post written by Margaret Polaneczky, a gynecologist at Weill Cornell Medical College, back in 2009. That’s when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force first recommended that average-risk women in their 40s shouldn’t be automatically be screened for breast cancer

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Aaron Carroll: it will most likely be even harder to change the public’s expectations. For decades, we’ve been told, over and over, that more screening is better, that early detection is the key to a cure. That’s true, up to a point. We seem to have passed that point, though, and more and more experts are trying to reverse course

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