Now he’s toiling to understand just what happened. Biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov knew he’d done something pretty big: He’d conducted the first experiment in the U.S. to edit a dysfunctional gene in a viable human embryo. That was sure to spark a debate about designer babies and draw ire from the anti-abortion groups that so vehemently oppose such research

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The US FDA currently forbids any use outside of a research setting. But recent history has shown that people who want access to such techniques “can find people willing to perform them in venues where they’re able to do so,” said Jeffrey Kahn, who directs Johns Hopkins University’s Berman Institute of Bioethics. “It will happen whether we discuss it or not, and we need to talk about these things before they happen, That’s now.”

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The scientist who once fraudulently claimed to have created embryonic stem cells matched to human patients and the one who really did it plan to conduct joint research, a Korean newspaper reported this morning. A Chinese regenerative medicine company will provide financial support, according to the account

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