The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease

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Victoria Gray is waiting patiently in a hospital room at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville

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But signing up black patients for clinical trials will be a hard sell. The first attempts to use a groundbreaking gene-editing technology in people will likely target patients with sickle cell disease, a crippling inherited disorder that in the U.S. predominantly strikes African-Americans

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About 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease (formerly known as sickle cell anemia). Most of them are black. And many of them have faced challenges from the health care industry in getting their condition addressed

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The first-in-the-world case is detailed in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine

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Bioethics scholar and sickle cell disease researcher Carlton Haywood Jr. has been recognized by Ebony Magazine on its Power 100 list

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Our Carlton Haywood is a bioethicist, patient, researcher and advocate

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