Americans may soon be able to get their medical records through smartphone apps as easily as they order takeout food from Seamless or catch a ride from Lyft. But prominent medical organizations are warning that patient data-sharing with apps could facilitate invasions of privacy — and they are fighting the change

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Sam Cavaliere, a San Diego tech worker, considers himself in average health, though the 47-year-old admits, “I can always stand to lose a little weight.” Like a lot of iPhone owners, he uses Apple’s Health app to keep track of his weight, his exercise routines and how many steps he takes in a day

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For example, data about a mobile phone’s past location and movement patterns can be used to predict where a person lives, who their employer is, where they attend religious services and the age range of their children based on where they drop them off for school

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In this vast border region, tuberculosis control is a high-stakes game of chase. Some patients infected with the disease frequently cross into Mexico for work or to visit family, slipping off the radar of public health workers who must verify they are taking their medicines

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Digital gizmos can monitor your heart, whether it’s a wrist-worn fitness tracker or a smartphone app to help cardiologists analyze diagnostic tests. The question is whether they’re going to do your heart any good. The short answer: It depends

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Carissa Véliz (University of Oxford) warns us: we should act now before it is too late. Privacy damages accumulate, and, in many cases, are irreversible. We urgently need more regulations to protect our privacy

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Apple plans to add a new feature to its Health app that will allow users to easily sign up with a national organ donor registry

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In recent years, mobile technology has granted me and countless others the ability to collect an unprecedented amount of information about our habits and well-being

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