So it happened again. An underreported story about a half-baked advance in cancer medicine caught fire and scorched its way through social media, onto network TV, and into the minds of millions of people

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In two studies published recently, researchers ran systematic searches through crowdfunding sites to see just how pervasive this issue is. They identified thousands of campaigns raising millions of dollars for medical treatments that are not backed by science

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The FDA said that it had also written to 20 clinics that offer unapproved stem cell treatments, warning them that such products are generally regulated by the agency and encouraging the clinics to contact federal regulators before November 2020, when enforcement will tighten

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This briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics examines the ethical issues that can arise when patients and doctors wish to use experimental treatments

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Desperate & Duped?

October 24, 2018

GoFundMe means big bucks for dubious care. People seeking dubious, potentially harmful treatment for cancer and other ailments raised nearly $7 million over two years from crowdfunding sites, a study found

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Clear Up This Stem-Cell Mess

September 27, 2018

Confusion about mesenchymal stem cells is making it easier for people to sell unproven treatments, warn Douglas Sipp, Pamela G. Robey and Leigh Turner

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But some clinics stray from the science and hype its benefits. Walk into Kalypso Wellness Centers in San Antonio, Texas, and you might be treated with one of five “proprietary blends” of ketamine. They’re not cheap — $495 per infusion

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People with multiple sclerosis sometimes become desperate and will travel to other countries for experimental stem cell treatments. That’s not always a good idea

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