They’re the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments.

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Stem cell clinics multiply, with heartbreaking results for some patients

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More than half of Americans take vitamin supplements, including 68 percent of those age 65 and older, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. Among older adults, 29 percent take four or more supplements of any kind, according to a Journal of Nutrition study published in 2017

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For the crowd of mostly baby boomers, who’d just finished their healthy lunch of salmon fillet on a bed of grains and vegetables, the warning could not have been more dire: You’re running out of time

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(Animated map video) There are now so many clinics selling non-FDA approved stem cell offerings across the U.S. that tens or hundreds of thousands of patients are at risk. How did we get here?

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Buyer be wary. We are witnessing great promise in medicine today. The vocabulary dazzles: “precision medicine,” “stem cells,” “moon shot,” and other terms that hint at exciting new possibilities. But it is also a time of great vulnerability for patients

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Stem cell medicine has huge potential but unscrupulous clinics offering unrealistic hopes are endangering its future

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Lawmakers in Austin have approved a bill authorizing unapproved stem cell therapies, putting Texas on track to become the first state to explicitly recognize the experimental treatments

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