Do classical musicians have a role to play in advancing social justice? We talk to composer Judah Adashi, who is on the faculty of the Peabody Institute. Adashi is teaching a new workshop at the Peabody on Art and Activism

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Ray couldn’t find work — or safety. Over time, he grew isolated, eating meals of cheap takeout on his couch while watching TV. The salty food and inactivity left him with diabetes, swollen limbs, and ultimately heart failure. His neighborhood helped create the conditions that killed him, and they continue to take their toll on the children and grandchildren Ray left behind

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Art and Activism Workshop

September 19, 2016

Earlier this year, Judah Adashi received from Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the grant was twofold: first, to fund a new piece about the unseen violence of solitary confinement in America, specifically the tragic story of Kalief Browder. The second part involved the creation of a biweekly, two-hour workshop, focused on contemporary intersections between music and social justice

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Discussion on future of public health explores rise of pandemics, mental illness in prisons, social justice movements. Bloomberg School event features journalists Sonia Shah, Laura Sullivan, Yamiche Alcindor

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Has the country done enough to overcome its Jim Crow health care history?

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CVS, its front shelves crammed with brightly-packaged processed foods and household cleaning supplies, is an island of abundance for this West Baltimore neighborhood, one of the city’s poorest. It’s a contrast that shows what’s changed and what hasn’t in the past year, since Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man, died of injuries sustained in police custody, unleashing days of protests

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Tale of Two Baltimore

April 15, 2016

Experts discuss roots of city health disparities. During a panel discussion Wednesday evening, public health experts explored more than a century of discriminatory public policy in Baltimore, and the results: two Baltimores with extreme—and life-threatening—health disparities for residents

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The poor in some cities — big ones like New York and Los Angeles, and also quite a few smaller ones — live nearly as long as their middle-class neighbors or have seen rising life expectancy in the 21st century. But in some other parts of the country, adults with the lowest incomes die on average as young as people in much poorer nations like Rwanda, and their life spans are getting shorter

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