The new tools will likely open the doors for scientists to explore many novel areas. With comments from our Alan Regenberg

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CRISPR’s reputation was tarnished last year after a researcher in China edited a gene in embryos that went on to develop into two baby girls. The current CRISPR trials don’t have the same ethical challenges — the therapies won’t lead to DNA changes that can be inherited, says Alan Regenberg, Still, he says, there’s reason for caution when working with humans

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The technology that produced a global scandal in China last year has entered into clinical trials to treat sickle cell anemia and an eye disease

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Victoria Gray is waiting patiently in a hospital room at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville

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The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot

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The disease may be among the first to be treated with the novel gene-editing tool

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The first-in-the-world case is detailed in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine

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Genetic repairs are curing patients—but only at a few elite centers.

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