The brains of college football players showed signs of “fraying” after a season of play

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Julian Savulescu writes ,”Middle-distance runner Caster Semenya will need to take hormone-lowering agents, or have surgery, if she wishes to continue her career in her chosen athletic events… This ruling is flawed. On the basis of science and ethical reasoning, there are ten reasons CAS’s decision does not stand up.”

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The ruling was a defeat for Caster Semenya, a two-time Olympic champion at 800 meters from South Africa, who had challenged proposed limits placed on female athletes with naturally elevated levels of the muscle-building hormone testosterone

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A pair of neuroscientists are working with Major League Baseball to help measure the mental aspects of a batter’s swing

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The Boston researcher who examined the brain of former football star Aaron Hernandez says it showed the most damage her team had seen in an athlete so young

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Hockey and DNA

November 9, 2017

Personalized genetic tests show up rink-side. Alex Hogan writes, “At an NHL hockey game, it’s not uncommon to see some blood. The other day, it turned out to be some of my own.”

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The promise of gene therapy has the potential to drastically limit the impact of human disease by altering the make-up of the body’s cells to fight back against deadly invaders. If used recreationally, though, gene therapy could also expand the physical limits of human strength and endurance. Like high-tech steroids, gene therapies could one day be a new way for athletes to dope

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Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end and a convicted murderer, was 27 when he committed suicide in April. Yet a posthumous examination of his brain showed he had such a severe form of the degenerative brain disease C.T.E. that the damage was akin to that of players well into their 60s

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