Whether hair pulling, skin picking or cheek biting, body-focused repetitive behaviours blight many people’s lives. How can science help us understand and treat these distressing conditions better?

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He wants to give it away for free. A Harvard scientist thinks he’s reached a new milestone: a genetic test that help identify people who are at high risk of heart attacks. Can he convince doctors to use it?

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According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 44.7 million adults in the U.S. currently live with mental illness, 19.2 million of whom are receiving treatment in the form of counseling and prescription medication

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Without any public scrutiny, insurers and data brokers are predicting your health costs based on data about things like race, marital status, how much TV you watch, whether you pay your bills on time or even buy plus-size clothing

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History is repeating itself. Twenty years ago, a pain management crisis existed. As many as 70 percent of cancer patients in treatment at that time, or in end-of-life care, experienced unalleviated pain

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Words Matter

May 10, 2018

A Johns Hopkins study led by our Mary Catherine Beach found that physicians who use stigmatizing language in their patients’ medical records may affect the care those patients get for years to come

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A life-threatening heart infection afflicts a growing number of people who inject opioids or meth. Costly surgery can fix it, but the addiction often goes unaddressed

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In a recent essay in Vogue, Lena Dunham described her decision to have a hysterectomy at age 31 after a decade of unsuccessful attempts to control increasingly excruciating pain from endometriosis. The decision was difficult because it meant that she would never be able to become pregnant, something she had long dreamed of, but also because her health care providers did not take her pain seriously

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