But signing up black patients for clinical trials will be a hard sell. The first attempts to use a groundbreaking gene-editing technology in people will likely target patients with sickle cell disease, a crippling inherited disorder that in the U.S. predominantly strikes African-Americans

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State financial regulators in New York said Wednesday that they would investigate reports that gay men have been denied insurance policies covering life, disability or long-term care because they were taking medication to protect themselves against HIV

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Nearly 40 years of violent conflict is driving a growing mental health crisis in Afghanistan

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Johnson & Johnson uses the prospect of jail time to market a schizophrenia drug

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Many studies that link global warming to civil unrest are biased and exacerbate stigma about the developing world

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Three years ago, Dr. Philip J. Cheng, a urology resident at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, nicked himself while preparing an HIV-positive patient for surgery. Following hospital protocol, he took a one-month course of Truvada, a cocktail of two anti-HIV drugs, to prevent infection. Later, because he was an unattached gay man, he decided to keep taking Truvada to protect himself from getting HIV through sex

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About 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease (formerly known as sickle cell anemia). Most of them are black. And many of them have faced challenges from the health care industry in getting their condition addressed

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Jessica Porten went to a women’s clinic in Sacramento, CA that accepts her Medicaid coverage, to talk about medication options and therapy. Porten admitted to the nurse that she was having some violent thoughts. “I described maybe hitting myself or squeezing the baby too tight,” she said. “But I was very adamant through the entire appointment that I was not going to hurt myself and I was not going to hurt my children.”

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