Bill Jenkins, a government epidemiologist who tried to expose the unethical Tuskegee syphilis study in the 1960s and devoted the rest of his career to fighting racism in health care, died on Feb. 17 in Charleston, S.C. He was 73

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In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service enlisted African-American men in Macon County, Alabama in a syphilis study. The men weren’t asked for informed consent — and were told they would get treatment. They didn’t, even after penicillin was shown to cure syphilis. Host Sheilah Kast discusses what happened and the implications for research today with whistleblower, Peter Buxtun, and our Nancy Kass

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Outbreaks of a deadly, sexually transmitted disease confound health officials, whose obstacles include drug shortages, uneducated doctors and gangs

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It has been 45 years since the nation learned that more than 600 African-American men from rural Alabama were experimented on without their consent, and left untreated in a notorious federally funded syphilis study

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Our Nancy Kass is a guest editor of the American Journal of Public Health’s comprehensive look at the current ethical landscape of human subjects research with minority populations

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Dan O’Connor on human subjects protections and the meaning of ‘what happened in Guatemala’

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