Attacks on health facilities and health workers in Syria are likely more common than previously reported, and local data collectors can help researchers more accurately measure the extent and frequency of these attacks, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine. Authors include our Leonard Rubenstein

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Summary of a Documentary Screening and Discussion with an expert panel that included our Leonard Rubenstein

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Rising rates of chronic disease and deaths from violence can be curbed only if fighting is brought to an end, say researchers

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Targeting health care facilities during conflict has occurred before. But unlike the attacks on hospital ships during World War I, or even sporadic attacks in more recent conflicts, the pace of attacks on health facilities, workers, and resources in Syria and Yemen is massive and unrelenting

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Our Leonard Rubenstein. a lawyer who also directs a program on human rights, health and conflict at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. says there were a staggering number of assaults on health care facilities in 2016. Rubenstein is the editor of a new report called “Impunity Must End” about aggression against health facilities and health workers globally last year

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In truth, there is no way to come with a 100 percent accurate count of all the health workers who have died since the conflict in Syria that began six years ago this month

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Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Faculty and others respond to the recent executive order, US refugee resettlement and policy, and related public health and bioethics concerns.

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“We’re in a state of never-ending emergency within an emergency,” says Hazem Rihawi, a lead NGO coordinator on the Turkish-Syrian border, who liaises between aid organizations and tries to identify where medical supplies are most needed. “We don’t have the resources for sophisticated surgery and treatment, so we’re pushing for [doctors] to use what you have.”

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