Heather Ann Thomspon writes, “Recently I received a message from a freelance writer, Eric Beaumont, who had a question about a paragraph in my book that mentioned a doctor conducting experiments at Attica on prisoners”

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Repeated blood draws during a hospital stay can have a negative impact on a patient’s health and contribute to rising health care costs. In a review article published this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, physicians at Johns Hopkins joined an international team that crafted an improvement blueprint to reduce repetitive lab testing for hospitalized patients

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Promotional material prepared for the event bears the logos of the company and the Ravens with the message: “Purple and Black are in your genes — now find out what else is.” Orig3n is offering — for free — a test of four genes. These include the ACTN3 gene, which the firm says can yield information on whether a person “is likely to have enhanced performance in power and sprint activities or is considered normal.”

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Not getting an answer at all. “I thought you could have a mutated gene or not, and with all the cancer in my family, I believed I would carry a mutation. I didn’t know there was this huge third category,” she says. “I got no information – it felt like a huge waste of blood to get a giant question mark.”

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Barbara Ellen: They promise to reveal everything from our ancestry to our chances of serious illness. But are DNA tests accurate and do they tell us anything worthwhile?

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Bringing genetics into medicine leads to more accuracy, better diagnosis and personalised treatment – but not for all. Carrie Arnold meets families for whom gene testing has led only to unanswered questions

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Hospitals and pharmacies are required to toss expired drugs, no matter how expensive or vital. Meanwhile the FDA has long known that many remain safe and potent for years longer

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