Someone questioned his Japanese ancestry. So Kim, 34, took out his phone and consulted the 23andMe website. That’s when he discovered his ethnic identity had changed. The site that once told him he was about 40% Japanese now pegged that figure at 5%. He was, in an instant, fully Korean again

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Donald Cline must have thought no one would ever know. Then DNA testing came along.

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A new report, developed by the Pregnancy Research Ethics for Vaccines, Epidemics and New Technologies (PREVENT) working group, identifies a cycle of exclusion that prevents pregnant women from accessing the benefits of vaccines. With comments from our Carleigh Krubiner

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For at least two decades, the New York City Housing Authority routinely disputed tests that revealed lead in its apartments. Private landlords almost never do this

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The FDA on Wednesday cleared the first DNA test meant to be marketed directly to consumers to help them determine how well certain drugs may work for them. The test was developed by 23andMe and, as with other tests from the consumer genetics giant, customers will be able to simply mail in a spit sample to get results

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Janet Winston had a rash that wouldn’t go away. The English professor from Eureka, Calif., always had been sensitive to ingredients in skin creams and cosmetics. This time, however, the antifungal cream she was prescribed to treat her persistent rash seemed to make things worse. Was she allergic to that, too?

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A simulation lets autonomous cars experience situations that are too dangerous to try in reality

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A landmark report says pregnant and lactating women should be included in clinical trials. It’s unclear what the chances are that DHHS will agree with the recommendations in the report, but either way, says Ruth Faden, founder of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, “the very existence of the report is huge.”

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