Addyi Rises Again

July 11, 2018

Addyi, a drug that made a splash when it was approved in the summer of 2015 as the first “female Viagra,” is back. Its rise, fall, and rise again is an example of shrewd pharmaceutical marketing and the potential dangers it can have on patients

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“I thought it would be good to get tested,” says Steyn. “I thought this is something I should know.” She ordered a $200 testing kit from the company, 23andme, spit into a small plastic tube, sent it back and waited for the results

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There are now several experimental treatments vying to be tested, but each must be greenlit by national regulatory authorities whenever and wherever an outbreak occurs. There remain deeply divergent positions among scientists about how to design outbreak trials, specifically whether studies that don’t compare treatments to placebos can generate useful data

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The rise of spit kits is leaving consumers with lots of data and few answers. Genetic counselors could help people understand these results, but there aren’t enough of them to go around

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Q&A featuring comments from our Juli Murphy Bollinger

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In February 2016, the FDA recommended that collection of donated blood cease in areas in the United States in which ZIKV was active, unless blood testing or pathogen-reduction methods could be implemented. At the time, no vectorborne cases of ZIKV infection had been reported in the continental United States; however, an epidemic was under way in the U.S. territories, most notably in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

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An expensive screening program designed to keep the Zika virus out of the Red Cross’ blood supply has caught fewer than a dozen infected donations, a new study published Wednesday revealed. Study authors include our Jeremy Sugarman

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Vulnerable groups, such as children, prisoners and people with limited mental capacity, are usually excluded from drug trials. And, until quite recently, it was considered unethical to test drugs on pregnant women, too… But the tide is turning

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