Sam Cavaliere, a San Diego tech worker, considers himself in average health, though the 47-year-old admits, “I can always stand to lose a little weight.” Like a lot of iPhone owners, he uses Apple’s Health app to keep track of his weight, his exercise routines and how many steps he takes in a day

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Seeking to build a central identification platform, Kenya is storing the fingerprints, eyes, faces, voices, DNA, and location of its nearly 50-million population, and linking the data to everything from identity cards to access to education, health, and social services

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The Chinese authorities turned to a Massachusetts company and a prominent Yale researcher as they built an enormous system of surveillance and control

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In this vast border region, tuberculosis control is a high-stakes game of chase. Some patients infected with the disease frequently cross into Mexico for work or to visit family, slipping off the radar of public health workers who must verify they are taking their medicines

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Anthony Ryan Hatch writes, “Moments after Neo eats the red pill in “The Matrix,” he touches a liquefied mirror that takes over his skin, penetrating the innards of his body with computer code. When I first learned about the controversial new digital drug Abilify MyCite, I thought of this famous scene and wondered what kinds of people were being remade through this new biotechnology”

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“Smart pills” that can track whether or when you’ve taken your medication might be helpful for some people. Unfortunately, the first smart pill approved by the Food and Drug Administration, Abilify MyCite, is a drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. That raises tricky ethical issues

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For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a digital pill — a medication embedded with a sensor that can tell doctors whether, and when, patients take their medicine

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From policing and healthcare to defence and dating sites AI is being woven into the fabric of our lives – for better and for worse

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