Citing moral distress as a major factor, Professor Cynda Rushton, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and Berman Institute of Bioethics, developed a mindfulness program that helps professionals identify and cope with ethical dilemmas. The idea is to help frontline staff address those issues while staying in the field

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Mindful Ethical Practice and Resilience Academy at Johns Hopkins helps nurses speak up, address moral dilemmas and move on in a healthy manner – with comment from our Cynda Rushton

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This tri-school event hosted by the Johns Hopkins schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health celebrates 50 years of JHU collaboration with the Fogarty International Center. Keynote by Roger Glass, director of the Fogarty International Center. Participants also include our Nancy Kass. April 16, 2:30-5:30pm. Livestreaming will be available

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Laurie Scudder interviews with Anna Goddu and our Mary Catherine Beach. Could the electronic health record (EHR)—specifically, the notes written by clinicians about their patients—be another way in which clinicians may unwittingly transmit bias to each other?

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Matthew De Camp, MD, PhD, from Johns Hopkins University, Berman Institute of Bioethics, and colleagues authored a position paper from the American College of Physicians published the Annals of Internal Medicine which says volunteer medical trips and other short-term experiences in global health come with specific ethical responsibilities for physicians regarding the people and communities they serve

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Residents surveyed cite preference for limited-hour programs, but program directors report high levels of dissatisfaction with this approach compared to flexible-hour programs

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Think before you snap that selfie. That’s the serious message of a joint campaign created by two groups that have spent the past few years poking fun at problematic photos taken by Western volunteers. They often have the tendency to paint themselves as saviors to needy people in low-income countries

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The American system relies to a surprising extent on foreign medical graduates, most of whom are citizens of other countries when they arrive. By any objective standard, the United States trains far too few physicians to care for all the patients who need them. We rank toward the bottom of developed nations with respect to medical graduates per population

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